Basquete

BASQUETE

LSU head coach Will Wade answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

LSU head coach Will Wade answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Texas A&M head coach Billy Kennedy answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Texas A&M head coach Billy Kennedy answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Tyler Davis of Texas A&M answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Robert Williams of Texas A&M answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Duop Reath of LSU answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Warriors Get Their 16-17 Championship Rings

Ahead of their season opener against the Houston Rockets, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver awards the Golden State Warriors with their 16-17 Championship rings.

Alabama head coach Avery Johnson answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Kentucky's Hamidou Diallo answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Louisville trustees fire athletic director Tom Jurich

University of Louisville athletic director Tom Jurich arrives at the University's administration building for a meeting, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. The university has scheduled a news conference Wednesday during which officials are expected to address the university's involvement in a federal bribery investigation, the latest scandal involving the Cardinals men's basketball program. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

Rhianna Probably Should’ve Cut Gordon Hayward From Her NBA Hype Video

In case you didn’t know, Rhianna is a pretty big NBA fan. So you’d assume the singer (?) saw Boston... Read More »

Rhianna Probably Should’ve Cut Gordon Hayward From Her NBA Hype Video

In case you didn’t know, Rhianna is a pretty big NBA fan. So you’d assume the singer (?) saw Boston... Read More »

Alabama's Dazon Ingram answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Michael Jordan scores again, this time with his Jumpman logo

The Michael Jordan "Jumpman" logo is shown on merchandise as a customer shops at the Charlotte Hornets' NBA basketball fan store in Charlotte, N.C., Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017. The NBA's new uniform contract with Nike could be a financial coup for Hornets owner Michael Jordan. Sports' greatest pitchman will be reaping the benefits of the Hornets being the only NBA team to wear the famous Jordan Brand "Jumpman" logo on their jerseys this season. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Michael Jordan scores again, this time with his Jumpman logo

The Michael Jordan "Jumpman" logo is shown on merchandise as a customer shops at the Charlotte Hornets' NBA basketball fan store in Charlotte, N.C., Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017. The NBA's new uniform contract with Nike could be a financial coup for Hornets owner Michael Jordan. Sports' greatest pitchman will be reaping the benefits of the Hornets being the only NBA team to wear the famous Jordan Brand "Jumpman" logo on their jerseys this season. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Alabama's Braxton Key answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Kentucky's Wenyen Gabriel answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Kentucky's Wenyen Gabriel, left, and Hamidou Diallo wait for a news conference with Kentucky head coach John Calipari to finish at the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Kentucky's Wenyen Gabriel, left, and Hamidou Diallo joke for the cameras as they wait for their interviews to begin during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Notebook: White questions media projection, wants team to ride momentum

Florida basketball coach Mike White spoke to reporters from media day in Nashville.

LeBron James & Cavs’ NBA Doubleheader Season Opener Soars Almost 100% Over 2016 – Update

UPDATE, 1:50 PM: The final scores on the court last night saw ex-champs the Cleveland Cavaliers and the Houston Rockets win the doubleheader games of the NBA season opener but now we have the other score, so to speak. Winning the night on cable for TNT, the Cavs’ victory over the Boston Celtics and the Rockets triumph over current champs the Golden State Warriors snagged an average of 4.9 million viewers. Or to put in the true dunk context, that's a whooping 53% over the…

NBA: Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers

(WARNING: Graphic content) Boston Celtics forward Gordon Hayward sits on the court after injuring his ankle against the Cleveland Cavaliers, October 17, 2017. Mandatory Credit: Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers

(WARNING: Graphic content) Boston Celtics forward Gordon Hayward sits on the court after injuring his ankle against the Cleveland Cavaliers, October 17, 2017. Mandatory Credit: Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports

Hayward receives encouragement from NBA players who overcame injuries

NBA: Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers

Boston Celtics forward Gordon Hayward (20) lays on the court after injuring his ankle during the first half against the Cleveland Cavaliers at Quicken Loans Arena, Cleveland, OH, USA, October 17, 2017. Mandatory Credit: Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports

NBA: Washington Wizards at Utah Jazz

FILE PHOTO - Mar 31, 2017; Salt Lake City, UT, USA; Utah Jazz forward Gordon Hayward (20) dribbles the ball as Washington Wizards forward Otto Porter Jr. (22) defends during the second half at Vivint Smart Home Arena. Mandatory Credit: Russ Isabella-USA TODAY Sports

Tyler Davis of Texas A&M answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Alabama head coach Avery Johnson answers questions during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Kentucky head coach John Calipari arrives at his interview table during the Southeastern Conference men's NCAA college basketball media day Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

Rockets coach Mike D'Antoni.

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

The Rockets pushed the NBA's small-ball era to a new extreme in their big opening-night win over the Warriors

Rockets coach Mike D'Antoni.

Now we know how the EPA's Scott Pruitt will replace science advisors with industry

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt is about to take a major step toward reshaping the agency's scientific advisory committees. This action, to come in the form of a directive next week, will effectively replace scientists on scientific advisory committees with representatives of the industries the EPA regulates. 

Apparently conflict of interest means different things to different people.

Typically staffed by top experts, the EPA's scientific advisory committees are tasked with ensuring that the scientific information the agency uses in its rule-making is the best-available data on the topic. 

This is especially important since the EPA gets sued constantly, so any rules or other actions the agency takes could be vulnerable in court if the science underpinning the decision turns out to be flawed or out of date. 

Pruitt has already taken unprecedented steps to alter the composition of these committees, including  not renewing terms for existing panel members, or dismissing members outright. 

The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June, 3, 2017.

The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June, 3, 2017.

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

On Tuesday, in a speech at the conservative Heritage Foundation in Washington, Pruitt announced the next step in his quest to bring more industry-friendly voices to the committees. He said he plans to issue a directive next week that would prohibit anyone from serving on an advisory committee who has received grant funding from the EPA. 

While that might seem like a commonsense move toward greater independence, the fact is that the EPA is one of the largest funding sources of environmental health research. Therefore, this requirement will likely disqualify hundreds of potential committee members, and instead allow representatives of industries regulated by the EPA — such as the chemical and energy industries —  to gain more representation. 

“The scientists that make up these bodies, and there are dozens and dozens of these folks, over the years as they’ve served on these committees, guess what’s also happened? They’ve received monies through grants, and sometimes substantial monies through grants," Pruitt said

One agency watchdog, Michael Halpern of the Union of Concerned Scientists, called Pruitt's move "gobsmackingly boneheaded." 

The implicit message in Pruitt's statement is that money going to scientific research somehow biases scientists and the advice they would give. This is a common argument put forward by climate deniers who assail the government's grants for scientific research. (Perhaps it's not a surprise that Pruitt denies that carbon dioxide is the main driver of global warming, then.)

"And if we have individuals that are on those boards receiving money from the agency sometimes going back years and years to the tune of literally tens of millions of dollars over time, that to me causes question on the independence and the veracity and the transparency of those recommendations that are coming our way," Pruitt said.

Hinting at the upcoming actions, Pruitt said: 

The UCS' Halpern wrote in a blog post that Pruitt's actions were grossly distorting the meaning of conflicts of interest. 

"Getting science advice from the EPA Science Advisory Board is like getting basketball tips from 40 Steph Currys. It’s the best in the business, volunteering their time in service of the public good," Halpern, the deputy director of the Center for Science and Democracy, wrote.

"So let’s recap: according to some, scientists who receive money from oil and chemical companies are perfectly qualified to provide the EPA with independent science advice, while those who receive federal grants are not. It’s a fundamental misrepresentation of how conflicts of interest work."

During the same Heritage Foundation appearance, which was broadcast via Facebook Live, Pruitt also addressed his desire for public debates on the fundamentals of climate science, which he says has never happened despite decades to centuries of open, peer-reviewed research.

2016 was the warmest year on record, beating the previous record set the year before.

2016 was the warmest year on record, beating the previous record set the year before.

Image: bob al-greene/mashable

Such red team, blue team debates, currently slated to take place early in 2018, are widely seen among scientists as an attempt to confuse the public about the reliability of climate science findings. 

Pruitt, clearly sees it differently. 

“The American people deserve, in my view, an objective, transparent, honest discussion about what we know and what we don’t know about CO2," Pruitt said. "It’s never taken place.”

Earlier this month, Pruitt announced the withdrawal of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan, which covered greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector. 

For now, at least, the EPA isn't putting any replacement rules into effect, despite a Supreme Court-mandated requirement to do so. 

It looks like we'll have to wait-and-see what the new advisory committees have to say about this.

Now we know how the EPA's Scott Pruitt will replace science advisors with industry

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt is about to take a major step toward reshaping the agency's scientific advisory committees. This action, to come in the form of a directive next week, will effectively replace scientists on scientific advisory committees with representatives of the industries the EPA regulates. 

Apparently conflict of interest means different things to different people.

Typically staffed by top experts, the EPA's scientific advisory committees are tasked with ensuring that the scientific information the agency uses in its rule-making is the best-available data on the topic. 

This is especially important since the EPA gets sued constantly, so any rules or other actions the agency takes could be vulnerable in court if the science underpinning the decision turns out to be flawed or out of date. 

Pruitt has already taken unprecedented steps to alter the composition of these committees, including  not renewing terms for existing panel members, or dismissing members outright. 

The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June, 3, 2017.

The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June, 3, 2017.

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

On Tuesday, in a speech at the conservative Heritage Foundation in Washington, Pruitt announced the next step in his quest to bring more industry-friendly voices to the committees. He said he plans to issue a directive next week that would prohibit anyone from serving on an advisory committee who has received grant funding from the EPA. 

While that might seem like a commonsense move toward greater independence, the fact is that the EPA is one of the largest funding sources of environmental health research. Therefore, this requirement will likely disqualify hundreds of potential committee members, and instead allow representatives of industries regulated by the EPA — such as the chemical and energy industries —  to gain more representation. 

“The scientists that make up these bodies, and there are dozens and dozens of these folks, over the years as they’ve served on these committees, guess what’s also happened? They’ve received monies through grants, and sometimes substantial monies through grants," Pruitt said

One agency watchdog, Michael Halpern of the Union of Concerned Scientists, called Pruitt's move "gobsmackingly boneheaded." 

The implicit message in Pruitt's statement is that money going to scientific research somehow biases scientists and the advice they would give. This is a common argument put forward by climate deniers who assail the government's grants for scientific research. (Perhaps it's not a surprise that Pruitt denies that carbon dioxide is the main driver of global warming, then.)

"And if we have individuals that are on those boards receiving money from the agency sometimes going back years and years to the tune of literally tens of millions of dollars over time, that to me causes question on the independence and the veracity and the transparency of those recommendations that are coming our way," Pruitt said.

Hinting at the upcoming actions, Pruitt said: 

The UCS' Halpern wrote in a blog post that Pruitt's actions were grossly distorting the meaning of conflicts of interest. 

"Getting science advice from the EPA Science Advisory Board is like getting basketball tips from 40 Steph Currys. It’s the best in the business, volunteering their time in service of the public good," Halpern, the deputy director of the Center for Science and Democracy, wrote.

"So let’s recap: according to some, scientists who receive money from oil and chemical companies are perfectly qualified to provide the EPA with independent science advice, while those who receive federal grants are not. It’s a fundamental misrepresentation of how conflicts of interest work."

During the same Heritage Foundation appearance, which was broadcast via Facebook Live, Pruitt also addressed his desire for public debates on the fundamentals of climate science, which he says has never happened despite decades to centuries of open, peer-reviewed research.

2016 was the warmest year on record, beating the previous record set the year before.

2016 was the warmest year on record, beating the previous record set the year before.

Image: bob al-greene/mashable

Such red team, blue team debates, currently slated to take place early in 2018, are widely seen among scientists as an attempt to confuse the public about the reliability of climate science findings. 

Pruitt, clearly sees it differently. 

“The American people deserve, in my view, an objective, transparent, honest discussion about what we know and what we don’t know about CO2," Pruitt said. "It’s never taken place.”

Earlier this month, Pruitt announced the withdrawal of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan, which covered greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector. 

For now, at least, the EPA isn't putting any replacement rules into effect, despite a Supreme Court-mandated requirement to do so. 

It looks like we'll have to wait-and-see what the new advisory committees have to say about this.

Now we know how the EPA's Scott Pruitt will replace science advisors with industry

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt is about to take a major step toward reshaping the agency's scientific advisory committees. This action, to come in the form of a directive next week, will effectively replace scientists on scientific advisory committees with representatives of the industries the EPA regulates. 

Apparently conflict of interest means different things to different people.

Typically staffed by top experts, the EPA's scientific advisory committees are tasked with ensuring that the scientific information the agency uses in its rule-making is the best-available data on the topic. 

This is especially important since the EPA gets sued constantly, so any rules or other actions the agency takes could be vulnerable in court if the science underpinning the decision turns out to be flawed or out of date. 

Pruitt has already taken unprecedented steps to alter the composition of these committees, including  not renewing terms for existing panel members, or dismissing members outright. 

The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June, 3, 2017.

The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June, 3, 2017.

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

On Tuesday, in a speech at the conservative Heritage Foundation in Washington, Pruitt announced the next step in his quest to bring more industry-friendly voices to the committees. He said he plans to issue a directive next week that would prohibit anyone from serving on an advisory committee who has received grant funding from the EPA. 

While that might seem like a commonsense move toward greater independence, the fact is that the EPA is one of the largest funding sources of environmental health research. Therefore, this requirement will likely disqualify hundreds of potential committee members, and instead allow representatives of industries regulated by the EPA — such as the chemical and energy industries —  to gain more representation. 

“The scientists that make up these bodies, and there are dozens and dozens of these folks, over the years as they’ve served on these committees, guess what’s also happened? They’ve received monies through grants, and sometimes substantial monies through grants," Pruitt said

One agency watchdog, Michael Halpern of the Union of Concerned Scientists, called Pruitt's move "gobsmackingly boneheaded." 

The implicit message in Pruitt's statement is that money going to scientific research somehow biases scientists and the advice they would give. This is a common argument put forward by climate deniers who assail the government's grants for scientific research. (Perhaps it's not a surprise that Pruitt denies that carbon dioxide is the main driver of global warming, then.)

"And if we have individuals that are on those boards receiving money from the agency sometimes going back years and years to the tune of literally tens of millions of dollars over time, that to me causes question on the independence and the veracity and the transparency of those recommendations that are coming our way," Pruitt said.

Hinting at the upcoming actions, Pruitt said: 

The UCS' Halpern wrote in a blog post that Pruitt's actions were grossly distorting the meaning of conflicts of interest. 

"Getting science advice from the EPA Science Advisory Board is like getting basketball tips from 40 Steph Currys. It’s the best in the business, volunteering their time in service of the public good," Halpern, the deputy director of the Center for Science and Democracy, wrote.

"So let’s recap: according to some, scientists who receive money from oil and chemical companies are perfectly qualified to provide the EPA with independent science advice, while those who receive federal grants are not. It’s a fundamental misrepresentation of how conflicts of interest work."

During the same Heritage Foundation appearance, which was broadcast via Facebook Live, Pruitt also addressed his desire for public debates on the fundamentals of climate science, which he says has never happened despite decades to centuries of open, peer-reviewed research.

2016 was the warmest year on record, beating the previous record set the year before.

2016 was the warmest year on record, beating the previous record set the year before.

Image: bob al-greene/mashable

Such red team, blue team debates, currently slated to take place early in 2018, are widely seen among scientists as an attempt to confuse the public about the reliability of climate science findings. 

Pruitt, clearly sees it differently. 

“The American people deserve, in my view, an objective, transparent, honest discussion about what we know and what we don’t know about CO2," Pruitt said. "It’s never taken place.”

Earlier this month, Pruitt announced the withdrawal of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan, which covered greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector. 

For now, at least, the EPA isn't putting any replacement rules into effect, despite a Supreme Court-mandated requirement to do so. 

It looks like we'll have to wait-and-see what the new advisory committees have to say about this.

Now we know how the EPA's Scott Pruitt will replace science advisors with industry

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt is about to take a major step toward reshaping the agency's scientific advisory committees. This action, to come in the form of a directive next week, will effectively replace scientists on scientific advisory committees with representatives of the industries the EPA regulates. 

Apparently conflict of interest means different things to different people.

Typically staffed by top experts, the EPA's scientific advisory committees are tasked with ensuring that the scientific information the agency uses in its rule-making is the best-available data on the topic. 

This is especially important since the EPA gets sued constantly, so any rules or other actions the agency takes could be vulnerable in court if the science underpinning the decision turns out to be flawed or out of date. 

Pruitt has already taken unprecedented steps to alter the composition of these committees, including  not renewing terms for existing panel members, or dismissing members outright. 

The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June, 3, 2017.

The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June, 3, 2017.

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

On Tuesday, in a speech at the conservative Heritage Foundation in Washington, Pruitt announced the next step in his quest to bring more industry-friendly voices to the committees. He said he plans to issue a directive next week that would prohibit anyone from serving on an advisory committee who has received grant funding from the EPA. 

While that might seem like a commonsense move toward greater independence, the fact is that the EPA is one of the largest funding sources of environmental health research. Therefore, this requirement will likely disqualify hundreds of potential committee members, and instead allow representatives of industries regulated by the EPA — such as the chemical and energy industries —  to gain more representation. 

“The scientists that make up these bodies, and there are dozens and dozens of these folks, over the years as they’ve served on these committees, guess what’s also happened? They’ve received monies through grants, and sometimes substantial monies through grants," Pruitt said

One agency watchdog, Michael Halpern of the Union of Concerned Scientists, called Pruitt's move "gobsmackingly boneheaded." 

The implicit message in Pruitt's statement is that money going to scientific research somehow biases scientists and the advice they would give. This is a common argument put forward by climate deniers who assail the government's grants for scientific research. (Perhaps it's not a surprise that Pruitt denies that carbon dioxide is the main driver of global warming, then.)

"And if we have individuals that are on those boards receiving money from the agency sometimes going back years and years to the tune of literally tens of millions of dollars over time, that to me causes question on the independence and the veracity and the transparency of those recommendations that are coming our way," Pruitt said.

Hinting at the upcoming actions, Pruitt said: 

The UCS' Halpern wrote in a blog post that Pruitt's actions were grossly distorting the meaning of conflicts of interest. 

"Getting science advice from the EPA Science Advisory Board is like getting basketball tips from 40 Steph Currys. It’s the best in the business, volunteering their time in service of the public good," Halpern, the deputy director of the Center for Science and Democracy, wrote.

"So let’s recap: according to some, scientists who receive money from oil and chemical companies are perfectly qualified to provide the EPA with independent science advice, while those who receive federal grants are not. It’s a fundamental misrepresentation of how conflicts of interest work."

During the same Heritage Foundation appearance, which was broadcast via Facebook Live, Pruitt also addressed his desire for public debates on the fundamentals of climate science, which he says has never happened despite decades to centuries of open, peer-reviewed research.

2016 was the warmest year on record, beating the previous record set the year before.

2016 was the warmest year on record, beating the previous record set the year before.

Image: bob al-greene/mashable

Such red team, blue team debates, currently slated to take place early in 2018, are widely seen among scientists as an attempt to confuse the public about the reliability of climate science findings. 

Pruitt, clearly sees it differently. 

“The American people deserve, in my view, an objective, transparent, honest discussion about what we know and what we don’t know about CO2," Pruitt said. "It’s never taken place.”

Earlier this month, Pruitt announced the withdrawal of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan, which covered greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector. 

For now, at least, the EPA isn't putting any replacement rules into effect, despite a Supreme Court-mandated requirement to do so. 

It looks like we'll have to wait-and-see what the new advisory committees have to say about this.